Where Tag Surfers Relate

Fat yes, obesity no

Understanding fat, understanding obesity, making the choice 

Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. 

Chemically speaking, fats are generally triesters of glycerol and fatty acids.

Fats may be either solid or liquid at normal room temperature, depending on their structure and composition. Although the words “oils”, “fats” and “lipids” are all used to refer to fats, “oils” is usually used to refer to fats that are liquids at normal room temperature, while “fats” is usually used to refer to fats that are solids at normal room temperature. “Lipids” is used to refer to both liquid and solid fats. (The word “oil” is used for any substance that does not mix with water and has a greasy feel, such as petroleum (or crude oil) and heating oil; regardless of its chemical structure.)

Fats form a category of lipid, distinguished from other lipids by their chemical structure and physical properties. This category of molecules is important for many forms of life, serving both structural and metabolic functions. They are an important part of the diet of most heterotrophs (including humans).

Examples of edible fats are lard (pig fat), margarine, butter, and cream. Fats or lipids are broken down in the body by enzymes called lipases.

Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat-soluble, meaning they can only be digested, absorbed, and transported in conjunction with fats. Fats are sources of essential fatty acids, an important dietary requirement.

Fats play a vital role in maintaining healthy skin and hair, insulating body organs against shock, maintaining body temperature, and promoting healthy cell function. They also serve as energy stores for the body. Fats are broken down in the body to release glycerol and free fatty acids. The glycerol can be converted to glucose by the liver and thus used as a source of energy.

Fat also serves as a useful buffer towards a host of diseases. When a particular substance, whether chemical or biotic — reaches unsafe levels in the bloodstream, the body can effectively dilute — or at least maintain equilibrium of — the offending substances by storing it in new fat tissue. This helps to protect vital organs, until such time as the offending substances can be metabolized and/or removed from the body by such means as excretion, urination, accidental or intentional bloodletting, sebum excretion, and hair growth.

While many people remove fat completely from their diet, it is wrong to do so. At the very least, a minimal amount of fat is needed for the body, and especially the brain, which uses fats. People who do not consume any kind of fat are more prone to brain diseases such as alzheimers. (Source: Wikipedia)

Obesity is a condition in which the natural energy reserve, stored in the fatty tissue of humans and other mammals, is increased to a point where it is associated with certain health conditions or increased mortality.

Obesity is both an individual clinical condition and is increasingly viewed as a serious public health problem. Excessive body weight has been shown to predispose to various diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep apnea, and osteoarthritis.

We view FAT and see FAT in many ways:

Fat as a problem (got to get into that bikini for summer);

Fat as an adjective, an affirmation (I am a fat fool)

Fat as an issue (they are staring at me because I am fat, being this way is not good for me)

Fat as a challenge (I will lose the weight by…)

Fat as a reprimand (I am too fat to merit his attention)

And so on…

The above makes it clear that FAT resides in our heads.  When we give meaning to FAT, when we send energetic thoughts to FAT, when we are bombarded with messages about FAT, when we believe deeply that we are FAT, then, guess what, WE ARE FAT.  Where attention goes, energy flows.

How about accepting that FAT is necessary for all living organisms, that FAT just is!

OBESITY, on the other hand, is the issue to deal with –  Abnormal Excessive fat accumulation (Source: WHO)

Obesity, especially central obesity (male-type or waist-predominant obesity), is an important risk factor for the “metabolic syndrome” (“syndrome X”), the clustering of a number of diseases and risk factors that heavily predispose for cardiovascular disease. These are diabetes mellitus type 2, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and triglyceride levels.  An inflammatory state is present, which — together with the above — has been implicated in the high prevalence of atherosclerosis (fatty lumps in the arterial wall) Source: Wikipedia)

Body Mass Index

Overweight and obesity are defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health.

Body mass index (BMI) is a simple index of weight-for-height that is commonly used in classifying overweight and obesity in adult populations and individuals. It is defined as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters (kg/m2).

BMI provides the most useful population-level measure of overweight and obesity as it is the same for both sexes and for all ages of adults. However, it should be considered as a rough guide because it may not correspond to the same degree of fatness in different individuals.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines “overweight” as a BMI equal to or more than 25, and “obesity” as a BMI equal to or more than 30. These cut-off points provide a benchmark for individual assessment, but there is evidence that risk of chronic disease in populations increases progressively from a BMI of 21.

The new WHO Child Growth Standards, launched in April 2006, include BMI charts for infants and young children up to age 5. However, measuring overweight and obesity in children aged 5 to 14 years is challenging because there is not a standard definition of childhood obesity applied worldwide. WHO is currently developing an international growth reference for school-age children and adolescents. (Source: WHO)

Watch your Waist and your Waste

Moderation is key! Waistline grows and expands as  waste accumulates (caused usually by constipation). 

Being in the flow is critical for our health and wellbeing.  We need to increase our awareness of this flow, educate ourselves about the digestive process, acid/alkaline balance, the role of movement and motion, and the link between our thoughts and our lives – how much they are in harmony.

There is a saying that we are what we eat.  I say we are what we think.

Eliminating pounds, one day at a time

Here are links to three powerful ways to influence your BMI, the first one works deeply, very deeply at the cellular level.

20/20 debunks Cardio Exercise myth
It is now news that cardio – aerobics and the treadmill  – need to be revisited.
Cardio kills,” says Jim Karas in his new book, “The Cardio-Free Diet.” “Cardiovascular exercise kills a weight-loss plan, your internal organs, your immune system, your time and your motivation. If your true goal is to lose weight, interval strength training is the only way to go,” says Karas, an ABC News correspondent, celebrity trainer and fitness expert. 

 

Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle 

Lifetime-Natural Bodybuilder, Personal Trainer, Nutritionist and Success Coach From New Jersey Teaches You How to Turbo-Charge Your Metabolism, Gain Muscle, Burn Off Body Fat and Develop Unstoppable Motivation … Guaranteed! Discover How He’s Taught Thousands of People to Get Leaner Faster Than They Ever Thought Possible!

Even if You Have Less-than Average Genetics… Even If You’ve Never Succeeded at Losing Weight Before… Even If You Have Stubborn Fat Deposits That Don’t Seem To Budge… Right Here on This Web Page You’ve Found The Fat Loss Success System You’ve Been Looking For.

TO PURCHASE  Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscles  Click Here!

Fat loss for … Idiots

If all else fails and you really cannot reduce your weight, then this is for you  FAT LOSS 4 IDIOTS

 TO PURCHASE   Click Here! 

THE GOAL THEREFORE IS TO PLACE ALL  ATTENTION ON BEING YOUR  IDEAL WEIGHT, WHATEVER THAT IS FOR YOU, AND YOU AND YOU…AS WHERE ATTENTION GOES, ENERGY FLOWS.

You are what you eat and what you think…

Advertisements

Comments on: "Fat yes, obesity no" (1)

  1. Heard on the BBC Radio today 21 May 2007:

    Subcutaneous fat – ok; visceral fat -watch out, as you could be prone to cardiovascular disease. One way to know is to waist measurement over hip measurement; less than 0.9 for men ok; less than 0.8 for women ok – any thing greater could signal potential for cardio disease. The waist-hip ratio is key indicator of premature cardio problems. Get more information on how visceral fat and subcutaneous fat affect health; and how simple lifestyle changes could help in keeping arteries more elastic than rigid.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: